Thursday, July 9, 2015

Specimen collections

I have always been deeply fascinated by scientific specimen collections.

Wether they are pressed plants in a herbarium, lines of insects pinned to a board or creepy things in jars of formaldehyde, I find great beauty and fascination in preserved specimens and I have been known to spend hours perusing these collections in museums whenever I can. In my humble opinion, the power of a specimen collection is in the repetition. By having several examples of the same thing displayed in a clear simple manner, the similarities and differences can be clearly seen and a much deeper understanding can be developed than what you could glean from a single specimen alone. 

This new series of works references the ordered display of scientific specimens and the grouping of organisms into 'collections'. By exploring a variety of traits and features, such as leaf colour or coral structures, I hope to highlight the complexity and beauty of our natural world.  

So far this series only consists of a handful of studies, but I hope to expand the range as time goes on and develop many more stitched specimen collections. 
Specimen collection #4 (structure studies) - in the studio prior to framing
Specimen collection #4 (structure studies), 2015, embroidery thread and pins on paper, 70 x 70cm

Specimen collection #1 (Leaf colour study), 2015, embroidery thread and pins on paper, 85 x 35cm
Specimen collection #1 (Leaf colour study) - detail 
Specimen collection #2 (maple leaves), 2015, embroidery thread and pins on paper, 85 x 35cm
Specimen collection #2 (Maple leaves) - detail
Specimen Collection #3 (coral studies), 2015, embroidery thread and pins on paper, 85 x 35cm
Specimen collection #3 (coral studies) - detail







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